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Forum Home > FAT ALBERT DISCUSSION > General Fat Albert knowledge

Alan Stinar
Site Owner
Posts: 296

"An all-Marine Corps crew of three officers and five enlisted personnel operate the Lockheed-Martin C-130T Hercules, affectionately known as Fat Albert Airlines. Fat Albert joined the team in 1970 and flies more than 140,000 miles each season. It carries more than 40 maintenance and support personnel, their gear and enough spare parts and communication equipment to complete a successful air show.

Fat Albert cruises at a speed of more than 320 knots (approximately 360 miles per hour) at 27,000 feet. Four Allison turboprop engines, which produce more than 16,000 shaft-horsepower, provide Fat Albert Airlines with the power to land and depart on runways as short as 2,500 feet.

At select show sites, Fat Albert demonstrates its jet-assisted takeoff (JATO) capability. Eight solid-fuel rocket bottles, four on each side, attached near the rear paratrooper doors thrust the Hercules skyward. Fired simultaneously, the JATO bottles allow the mammoth transport aircraft to takeoff within 1,500 feet, climb at a 45-degree angle, and propel it to an altitude of 1,000 feet in approximately 15 seconds. Getting Fat Albert airborne in minimal time and distance simulates conditions in hostile environments or on short, unprepared runways." - taken from the Official Blue Angels website here

 

In 1992, more than one million people viewed Blue Angels’ performances during a 30-day European deployment to Sweden, Finland, Russia, Romania, Bulgaria, Italy, the United Kingdom and Spain. This was the first European deployment in 19 years.

 


November 11, 2010 at 9:53 AM Flag Quote & Reply

William Smith
Member
Posts: 3

I was on the Eastern European tour, but not in Bert.  I was in "Ernie", a 252 bird that was tasked with flying lead maintenance for the blue jets while Bert flew trail.  I have pictures of the trip but I have to dig the prints out of a box and scan them in before I can post them.  I will also need to dig out my first log book to look up what plane we were in and who else was on the crew.  I do remember the oher Navs were Dave "super dave" Austin and I think CWO Kikta (sp?) too.  Engineer was Bob "yo-bob" Wtulich (SP?).  more later when i get time.

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I am NOT WF smith!

December 3, 2010 at 10:52 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Daniel Wesolowski
Member
Posts: 1

I recently got to see the current Fat Albert fly, in my home town of Milwaukee.  I noticed the External Fuel Tanks were removed.  I was wondering why? 

August 4, 2017 at 11:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alan Stinar
Site Owner
Posts: 296

Daniel Wesolowski at August 4, 2017 at 11:19 PM

I recently got to see the current Fat Albert fly, in my home town of Milwaukee.  I noticed the External Fuel Tanks were removed.  I was wondering why? 

I'm actually going to ask a current Fat Albert Flight Engineeer right now.

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Alan Stinar
Creator, Marine Battleherks
Owner, Lion's Roar Media LLC

August 14, 2017 at 6:02 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alan Stinar
Site Owner
Posts: 296

Daniel Wesolowski at August 4, 2017 at 11:19 PM

I recently got to see the current Fat Albert fly, in my home town of Milwaukee.  I noticed the External Fuel Tanks were removed.  I was wondering why? 

Explanation given:

Alan Stinar -"Hey brother, I had a question from one of the Battleherk fans. Why doesn't Fat Albert have external tanks? Now I could give my guess because it doesn't travel far enough to warrant the additional fuel, plus that adds total weight. But I thought I'd ask you."

GySgt. Steve Stewart, Crewmaster for Fat Albert Airlines: "And limits our speed. Without it [the external tanks], the IFR pods, and with the slick paint, we can do 320kts."


There's your answer Sir!



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Alan Stinar
Creator, Marine Battleherks
Owner, Lion's Roar Media LLC

August 14, 2017 at 6:09 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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